Auto-Immune

What is Ozone Therapy? Q & A

In Principles and Applications of Ozone Therapy (2011), Dr. Frank Shallenberger tells of his introduction to ozone therapy via the work of his predecessor, Dr. Charles Farr. In the 1980s, Dr. Farr began treating patients with Auto Immune Disease Syndrome (AIDS)—caused by the accumulation of molecules called oxidants—by injecting hydrogen peroxide, a powerful oxidant, directly into their veins. Dr. Farr’s success at alleviating symptoms such as fatigue, insomnia, brain fog, joint and muscle pain, and muscle weakness suggested that “the reason people get sick and diseased as they get older might have something to do with how they utilize and process oxygen” (Shallenberger, 2011). The following Q & A is intended provide an introduction to ozone, and the various ozone therapies our clinic provides: Q: What is ozone? A: Consisting of three oxygen (O2) atoms that share a common electron, ozone (O3) is a naturally occurring molecule—called an oxidant—in the earth’s atmosphere. Q: What is ozone therapy? A: Working in a manner similar to vaccines that promote the production of viral antibodies, ozone therapy stimulates the formation of oxidants in the blood, essentially training the body to utilize them efficiently. Q: How is ozone administered? A: There are three administration techniques for ozone therapy. The first, called an Ozone Sauna, involves the patient entering a hyperbaric chamber into which heated ozone is pumped. The heat causes the patient to perspire, while the ozone promotes the formation of oxidants in the blood that the body must then dispose of. When someone says they are “sweating it out,” this is the technique to which they are referring. The second option, called minor-Auto-Hemo-therapy (mAH), involves the blood being drawn out of the body, mixed with ozone, and then injected directly into the treatment site, while the third option administers blood-ozone intravenously, and is referred to as Major-Auto-Hemo-therapy (MAH). Q: What conditions can ozone therapy treat? A: Here at Restorative Health Clinic, we offer ozone therapy for patients with Lyme disease, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), and the chronic infections typically related to such illnesses. Essentially, any condition that impairs the body’s natural immunity can be treated with ozone, as it stimulates auto-immune defense mechanisms, necessary for tissue and cellular repair. Q: How do I know if ozone therapy is right for me? A: Consult your physician regarding the potential benefits and appropriate administration method for your particular condition. Dr. Vosloo and Dr. Hatlestad look forward to providing their guidance to anyone looking to improve their health and vitality. If you would like to schedule an appointment, please give us a call at...

Read More

Psoriasis – It’s More Than Skin Deep

This August is Psoriasis Awareness Month, and a good time to become more familiar with this diagnosis which affects millions of Americans. Despite being a relatively common condition, many of us hold onto the false assumption that it is only skin deep. Psoriasis, in all of its forms, actually goes much deeper, to the level of the immune system. Interested in knowing more? Read on for an introduction to this autoimmune disorder, related health concerns, and how it can be treated.   Psoriasis – An Immune System in Distress Like other Autoimmune (AI) diseases, Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory condition caused by a dysfunctional immune system. Though psoriatic presentations may differ, they are caused by the same underlying imbalances that exist within all AI diseases. Our immune systems are designed to create antibodies which tag harmful foreigners such as viruses & bacteria so that our white blood cells know where to attack. In AI disease, the body loses the ability to differentiate between a true foreigner, and our own tissues. As a result, antibodies toward our own cells are produced, directing our immune system to target tissues and organs. Inflammation develops, followed by tissue destruction and dysfunction within the body. While there is no single cause for AI disease, there are suspected triggers that may lead to development of auto(self)-antibodies. Additionally, there can be a genetic predisposition to developing an AI disease. Common triggers that may increase the risk for autoimmune disease include:      Chronic Infections (viral, bacterial, fungal & parasitic)      Continuous Allergen Exposure (including food sensitivities)      Chronic Heavy Metal Toxicity It is especially important to limit these potential triggers in your daily life if you have a known family history of autoimmune diseases. Psoriasis In Its Many Forms Plaque Psoriasis The most common form – Plaque psoriasis occurs when overactive inflammatory immune cells create cytokines (proteins that act as immune cell signals) which target keratinocytes in the skin. The result is an inflammatory, raised plaque which appears red and exhibits a silvery build up of dead cells. When removed, pinpoint bleeding known as Auspitz’s Sign is seen. Plaques tend to arise on the outer aspects of joints (knees, elbows) but can occur anywhere on the body. They may also arise in areas of recent skin trauma. Psoriatic Arthritis Approximately 30% of patients with Psoriasis will develop a type of Psoriatic Arthritis. This painful and debilitating condition is categorized as a spondyloarthropathy, meaning it is similar in symptoms and presentation to arthritis disorders such as Ankylosing Spondylitis, & Reactive Arthritis. The joints may become very swollen, red & extremely tender to palpate. The arthritis may develop on one or both sides of the body, and may affect the spine. Types of psoriatic arthritis include Symmetric, Asymmetric, Distal Interphalangeal predominant (joints closest to the fingertips), Spodylitis (affecting the spine) and Arthritis Mutilans (rare, but severely debilitating). Additional Forms Though plaque psoriasis is more commonly seen, individuals may also be diagnosed with: Guttate Psoriasis (thinner, smaller lesions that are greater in number) Inverse Psoriasis (red, smooth lesions that arise in body folds) Pustular Psoriasis (red, non-infectious pustules develop on the skin) Erythrodermic Psoriais (widespread, poorly defined red lesions with pain & peeling) How is Psoriasis Diagnosed? Diagnosis of psoriatic skin lesions can be based on appearance, and may include biopsy for confirmation. Additional testing for other psoriatic presentations may include X-rays or synovial fluid testing for joint symptoms, and blood tests to assess for inflammation (ESR, CRP) or a genetic component (HLA-B27). Further testing may be recommended to effectively rule out other potential causes. Treatment –...

Read More

Motherhood & Lupus: Taking Steps Toward a Healthy Pregnancy

For young women living with Lupus, becoming a mother can be a challenge both emotionally and physically. As the disease progresses, there is an increased risk of pregnancy complications such as miscarriage and preeclampsia. Furthermore, pregnancy has been known to increase the risk of worsening symptoms and disease flares for the expectant mother. A recent study, spotlighted by the National Institute of Health earlier this month, suggests a healthy pregnancy and birth may not be far from reach for hopeful young women living with Lupus. If general health is supported prior to conception, and antibodies are reduced such that there is low disease activity, there is a significant decrease in risk of pregnancy complications. Disease flares, especially, are reduced. While lower Lupus activity during pregnancy lessens risk to both mother and child, the route taken to stabilize the disease is just as important. The conventional treatment of Lupus involves immunosuppressive medications that are harmful to a developing fetus. Methotrexate, commonly used to treat Lupus, is known to cause birth defects and cannot be used during or after conception. Corticosteroids, conventionally given to pregnant mothers to reduce a disease flare, have an unknown effect on the fetus and should also be avoided. All immunosuppressive medications increase the risk of infection for the mother, and therefore the child. Complementary and alternative medicine is often used in treatment of Lupus and other autoimmune conditions, and may offer fewer side effects for mother and child. Below is an example of some research-based treatment options that should be considered in the treatment of Lupus before conception: High Dose Vitamin D Another study shared by NIH revealed high-dose vitamin D therapy to boost general immune function, while reducing activity of autoimmune cells, thereby reducing Lupus activity levels. As vitamin D is known to play a significant role in the brain development of a fetus, assessing for adequate levels in any future mother is important. Omega-3 Essential Fatty Acids Dietary supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids has a therapeutic effect on Lupus activity, as well as offering cardiovascular protection and benefitting fetal development. DHEA DHEA is a mild corticosteroid made naturally in the body, and found to be low in Lupus patients. Supplementation to balance hormone deficiencies prior to conception may help to reduce symptoms and disease activity by controlling excessive inflammation.   Work with your healthcare provider to create the appropriate treatment plan for yourself and your future child. There are many options available for addressing autoimmune disease and supporting your overall health. Questions? Feel free to contact us at (503) 747-2021.   Dr. Kaley Bourgeois   Resources: -Pregnancy Safe for Most Women with Lupus: Study. Nov 7, 2011. MedlinePlus, US National Library of Medicine-NIH, http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_118393.html –Vitamin D, Interferon Alpha Vaccine Show Promise Against Lupus, Nov 7, 2011. MedlinePlus, US National Library of Medicine-NIH, http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_118395.html –A randomised interventional trial of omega-3-polyunsaturated fatty acids on endothelial function and disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus. Ann Rheum Dis. 2008 Jun;67(6):841-8. Epub 2007 Sep 17.   –Dehydroepiandrosterone suppresses interleukin 10 synthesis in women with systemic lupus erythematosus. Ann Rheum Dis. 2004...

Read More

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis affects symptom load and quality of life

BACKGROUND: Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT) is a common disease, and is the most prevalent cause of hypothyroidism. Symptoms and diseases associated with HT are considered to be caused by hypothyroidism. We hypothesized that higher antithyroperoxidase (anti-TPO) antibody levels would be associated with an increased symptom load and a decreased quality of life in a female euthyroid patient collective.   METHODS: In a prospective cohort study 426 consecutive euthyroid female patients undergoing thyroid surgery for benign thyroid disease were included. Main outcome measures were preoperative anti-TPO levels, a symptom questionnaire and the SF-36 questionnaire, and lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid tissue as evaluated by histology.   RESULTS: Histology revealed HT in 28/426 (6.6%) subjects. To maximize the sum of the predictive values, a cut-off point for anti-TPO of 121.0 IU/mL was calculated (sensitivity 93.3% [95% confidence interval: 77.9%-99.0%]; specificity 94.7% [95% confidence interval: 92.0%-96.7%]) to predict the presence of histological signs of HT. The mean number of reported symptoms was significantly higher in patients with anti-TPO levels >121.0 IU/mL than in the other group . There were no differences in preoperative thyroid-stimulating hormone levels. Chronic fatigue, dry hair, chronic irritability, chronic nervousness, a history of breast cancer and early miscarriage, and lower quality-of-life levels were significantly associated with anti-TPO levels exceeding the cut-off point .   CONCLUSIONS: Women with HT suffer from a high symptom load. Hypothyroidism is only a contributing factor to the development of associated conditions. Ott J – Thyroid – 01-FEB-2011; 21(2): 161-7 Authors: Ott J; Promberger R; Kober F; Neuhold N; Tea M; Huber JC; Hermann M   Give us a call if you would like to schedule an appointment with one of our Doctors at Restorative Health Clinic @...

Read More