Heavy Metals

What is Ozone Therapy? Q & A

In Principles and Applications of Ozone Therapy (2011), Dr. Frank Shallenberger tells of his introduction to ozone therapy via the work of his predecessor, Dr. Charles Farr. In the 1980s, Dr. Farr began treating patients with Auto Immune Disease Syndrome (AIDS)—caused by the accumulation of molecules called oxidants—by injecting hydrogen peroxide, a powerful oxidant, directly into their veins. Dr. Farr’s success at alleviating symptoms such as fatigue, insomnia, brain fog, joint and muscle pain, and muscle weakness suggested that “the reason people get sick and diseased as they get older might have something to do with how they utilize and process oxygen” (Shallenberger, 2011). The following Q & A is intended provide an introduction to ozone, and the various ozone therapies our clinic provides: Q: What is ozone? A: Consisting of three oxygen (O2) atoms that share a common electron, ozone (O3) is a naturally occurring molecule—called an oxidant—in the earth’s atmosphere. Q: What is ozone therapy? A: Working in a manner similar to vaccines that promote the production of viral antibodies, ozone therapy stimulates the formation of oxidants in the blood, essentially training the body to utilize them efficiently. Q: How is ozone administered? A: There are three administration techniques for ozone therapy. The first, called an Ozone Sauna, involves the patient entering a hyperbaric chamber into which heated ozone is pumped. The heat causes the patient to perspire, while the ozone promotes the formation of oxidants in the blood that the body must then dispose of. When someone says they are “sweating it out,” this is the technique to which they are referring. The second option, called minor-Auto-Hemo-therapy (mAH), involves the blood being drawn out of the body, mixed with ozone, and then injected directly into the treatment site, while the third option administers blood-ozone intravenously, and is referred to as Major-Auto-Hemo-therapy (MAH). Q: What conditions can ozone therapy treat? A: Here at Restorative Health Clinic, we offer ozone therapy for patients with Lyme disease, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), and the chronic infections typically related to such illnesses. Essentially, any condition that impairs the body’s natural immunity can be treated with ozone, as it stimulates auto-immune defense mechanisms, necessary for tissue and cellular repair. Q: How do I know if ozone therapy is right for me? A: Consult your physician regarding the potential benefits and appropriate administration method for your particular condition. Dr. Vosloo and Dr. Hatlestad look forward to providing their guidance to anyone looking to improve their health and vitality. If you would like to schedule an appointment, please give us a call at...

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Rheumatoid Arthritis – low zinc and fully leaded!

Several studies found an inverse correlation between Zinc (↓) and toxic metals (↑) in arthritis patients. Taking antioxidant micronutrients, particularly a zinc supplement, may protect against the development of rheumatoid arthritis. In addition to giving focused nutrients to reduce abnormal biochemistry and inflammation, you also have to remove the undesirable elements. In this case, there is more toxic metals like lead, arsenic and cadmium in patients with arthritis than in the average person. Chelation is a very effective and safe process practiced since the 1940’s to remove undesirable metals from the body, which usually improves more than only the targeted disease. In this instance, lead, arsenic and cadmium are known mitochondrial energy production inhibitors, linked to chronic fatigue syndrome, cardiovascular disease, auto-immune disease, thyroid and other hormone problems. Action item: If you have rheumatoid arthritis, ensure you take appropriate, condition focused nutrients AND ask a board certified natural or integrated doctor to test if you have excessive toxic metals in your system that can fuel the disease along.   Rheumatoid Arthritis: low zinc, high lead, cadmium & arsenic Anti-inflammatory neutraceuticals  as therapy for rheumatoid arthritis. Interaction between zinc, cadmium, and lead rheumatoid arthritis subjects in relation to controls. A pilot study on zinc levels in patients with rheumatoid...

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Psoriasis – It’s More Than Skin Deep

This August is Psoriasis Awareness Month, and a good time to become more familiar with this diagnosis which affects millions of Americans. Despite being a relatively common condition, many of us hold onto the false assumption that it is only skin deep. Psoriasis, in all of its forms, actually goes much deeper, to the level of the immune system. Interested in knowing more? Read on for an introduction to this autoimmune disorder, related health concerns, and how it can be treated.   Psoriasis – An Immune System in Distress Like other Autoimmune (AI) diseases, Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory condition caused by a dysfunctional immune system. Though psoriatic presentations may differ, they are caused by the same underlying imbalances that exist within all AI diseases. Our immune systems are designed to create antibodies which tag harmful foreigners such as viruses & bacteria so that our white blood cells know where to attack. In AI disease, the body loses the ability to differentiate between a true foreigner, and our own tissues. As a result, antibodies toward our own cells are produced, directing our immune system to target tissues and organs. Inflammation develops, followed by tissue destruction and dysfunction within the body. While there is no single cause for AI disease, there are suspected triggers that may lead to development of auto(self)-antibodies. Additionally, there can be a genetic predisposition to developing an AI disease. Common triggers that may increase the risk for autoimmune disease include:      Chronic Infections (viral, bacterial, fungal & parasitic)      Continuous Allergen Exposure (including food sensitivities)      Chronic Heavy Metal Toxicity It is especially important to limit these potential triggers in your daily life if you have a known family history of autoimmune diseases. Psoriasis In Its Many Forms Plaque Psoriasis The most common form – Plaque psoriasis occurs when overactive inflammatory immune cells create cytokines (proteins that act as immune cell signals) which target keratinocytes in the skin. The result is an inflammatory, raised plaque which appears red and exhibits a silvery build up of dead cells. When removed, pinpoint bleeding known as Auspitz’s Sign is seen. Plaques tend to arise on the outer aspects of joints (knees, elbows) but can occur anywhere on the body. They may also arise in areas of recent skin trauma. Psoriatic Arthritis Approximately 30% of patients with Psoriasis will develop a type of Psoriatic Arthritis. This painful and debilitating condition is categorized as a spondyloarthropathy, meaning it is similar in symptoms and presentation to arthritis disorders such as Ankylosing Spondylitis, & Reactive Arthritis. The joints may become very swollen, red & extremely tender to palpate. The arthritis may develop on one or both sides of the body, and may affect the spine. Types of psoriatic arthritis include Symmetric, Asymmetric, Distal Interphalangeal predominant (joints closest to the fingertips), Spodylitis (affecting the spine) and Arthritis Mutilans (rare, but severely debilitating). Additional Forms Though plaque psoriasis is more commonly seen, individuals may also be diagnosed with: Guttate Psoriasis (thinner, smaller lesions that are greater in number) Inverse Psoriasis (red, smooth lesions that arise in body folds) Pustular Psoriasis (red, non-infectious pustules develop on the skin) Erythrodermic Psoriais (widespread, poorly defined red lesions with pain & peeling) How is Psoriasis Diagnosed? Diagnosis of psoriatic skin lesions can be based on appearance, and may include biopsy for confirmation. Additional testing for other psoriatic presentations may include X-rays or synovial fluid testing for joint symptoms, and blood tests to assess for inflammation (ESR, CRP) or a genetic component (HLA-B27). Further testing may be recommended to effectively rule out other potential causes. Treatment –...

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Even Low Lead Exposure Hinders Kids’ Reading

The negative impact lead has on our children is becoming more and more dangerous. All recent studies are suggesting that lead is much more of a problem at lower levels, than was previously thought. This will make us rethink the lead pipes in many of our homes. Especially for sensitive children, lead and other toxic metals can threaten their ability to grow and thrive normally. By Nancy Walsh, Staff Writer, MedPage Today Published: May 13, 2013: Reviewed by F. Perry Wilson, MD, MSCE; Instructor of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Dorothy Caputo, MA, BSN, RN, Nurse Planner Young children exposed to lead — even at low levels — are at risk for not meeting reading readiness benchmarks in kindergarten, a large study of urban children found. On tests of reading readiness, children with blood lead levels between 5 and 9 mcg/dL scored 4.5 points (95% CI −2.9 to −6.2) lower than those with levels below 5 mcg/dL, according to Pat McLaine, DPH, of the University of Maryland in Baltimore, and colleagues. And those with lead levels of 10 mcg/dL and higher had scores 10.1 points (95% CI −7 to −13.3) lower, the researchers reported online in Pediatrics. Almost 25 years ago the CDC established 10 mcg/dL as a “level of concern” for blood lead levels in children, and more recently determined that children whose levels are 5 mcg/dL should be targeted for intervention. “Learning to read is critical to the entire process of formal education,” McLaine and colleagues stated. This requires “proficiency in phonologic processing skills (using the sounds of one’s language to process written and oral language) and in the ability to decode new words,” they explained. A possible association between lead exposure and reading readiness has not previously been examined, but cooperation between school and public health authorities in Providence, R.I., provided an opportunity to consider this. Using linked data from the Rhode Island Department of Health and Providence’s public school district records, McLaine’s group compared results among 3,406 children who had been tested for blood lead levels an average of three times before entering kindergarten. Reading readiness was assessed on the Phonological Awareness Literacy Screening-Kindergarten (PALS-K) instrument, which measures reading-relevant cognitive abilities. The test is given in the fall of kindergarten, and children who score lower than 28 out of a total of 102 are given additional classroom instruction throughout the year, the researchers explained. The goal is for children to score 81 or higher by the time the test is repeated in the spring. The study population was diverse and largely low income, with almost 60% being Hispanic and more than 90% qualifying for federal school lunch assistance. The median blood level of lead in the entire group was 4.2 mcg/dL. One in five children had had at least one blood level reading of 10 mcg/dL or higher, and more than two-thirds had at least one level of 5 mcg/dL or above. “These results are markedly higher than [National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey] estimates from the same time and suggest that national population estimates may seriously underestimate the lead problem in urban schools,” the researchers observed. The highest levels were seen in blacks and children whose first language was not English or Spanish, such as those of Asian descent. About 35% of the children tested below the cutoff score on the PALS-K in the fall. These low scores were most commonly among boys, Hispanics, those receiving free lunches, and those with blood lead levels of 10 mcg/dL or higher. Low scores also were seen in children whose mothers hadn’t completed high school...

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