Neural therapy

What is Ozone Therapy? Q & A

In Principles and Applications of Ozone Therapy (2011), Dr. Frank Shallenberger tells of his introduction to ozone therapy via the work of his predecessor, Dr. Charles Farr. In the 1980s, Dr. Farr began treating patients with Auto Immune Disease Syndrome (AIDS)—caused by the accumulation of molecules called oxidants—by injecting hydrogen peroxide, a powerful oxidant, directly into their veins. Dr. Farr’s success at alleviating symptoms such as fatigue, insomnia, brain fog, joint and muscle pain, and muscle weakness suggested that “the reason people get sick and diseased as they get older might have something to do with how they utilize and process oxygen” (Shallenberger, 2011). The following Q & A is intended provide an introduction to ozone, and the various ozone therapies our clinic provides: Q: What is ozone? A: Consisting of three oxygen (O2) atoms that share a common electron, ozone (O3) is a naturally occurring molecule—called an oxidant—in the earth’s atmosphere. Q: What is ozone therapy? A: Working in a manner similar to vaccines that promote the production of viral antibodies, ozone therapy stimulates the formation of oxidants in the blood, essentially training the body to utilize them efficiently. Q: How is ozone administered? A: There are three administration techniques for ozone therapy. The first, called an Ozone Sauna, involves the patient entering a hyperbaric chamber into which heated ozone is pumped. The heat causes the patient to perspire, while the ozone promotes the formation of oxidants in the blood that the body must then dispose of. When someone says they are “sweating it out,” this is the technique to which they are referring. The second option, called minor-Auto-Hemo-therapy (mAH), involves the blood being drawn out of the body, mixed with ozone, and then injected directly into the treatment site, while the third option administers blood-ozone intravenously, and is referred to as Major-Auto-Hemo-therapy (MAH). Q: What conditions can ozone therapy treat? A: Here at Restorative Health Clinic, we offer ozone therapy for patients with Lyme disease, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), and the chronic infections typically related to such illnesses. Essentially, any condition that impairs the body’s natural immunity can be treated with ozone, as it stimulates auto-immune defense mechanisms, necessary for tissue and cellular repair. Q: How do I know if ozone therapy is right for me? A: Consult your physician regarding the potential benefits and appropriate administration method for your particular condition. Dr. Vosloo and Dr. Hatlestad look forward to providing their guidance to anyone looking to improve their health and vitality. If you would like to schedule an appointment, please give us a call at...

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Gentle nerve stimulation effective for migraines

Non-toxic, non-drowsy, non-chemical, non-addictive headache medicine that WORKS…………….. no side effects! This kind of medicine is more along the lines of what is needed to make a lasting difference in chronic pain. As you can see in the quoted MedPage study below, the highlighted words indicate the merit of micro-current as an electro medical modality: Non invasive – good, decreases side effects. Non chemical – good, less chance of messing something else up and needing more treatment for that in sensitive or multiple chemical sensitivity patients Affects trigeminal nerve – great, this is a very important pain generator in migraine headache Results of electrical stimulation of branches of the trigeminal nerve: Fewer monthly migraine attacks (19% versus 4% decline) Fewer days per month with any headache (33% versus 4% reduction) Lower monthly intake of acute anti-migraine drugs (-37% versus +1%) Other options: Neuraltherapy injections to the stellate and spehnopalatine ganglia are also very effective in clearing up migraine and sinus headaches. Cleaning up your diet by avoiding the usual culprit foods like wheat, gluten, egg etc and supporting your liver and gallbladder also are very helpful in cutting down the pain or sometimes better. Trigger points in the base of the skull, muscles of the neck and shoulders are also very strongly involved in migraine headache causation. Werner Vosloo ND, MHom Nerve Stimulation Cuts Down on Migraines By Crystal Phend, Senior Staff Writer, MedPage Today Published: February 11, 2013 Reviewed by Robert Jasmer, MD; Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco and Dorothy Caputo, MA, BSN, RN, Nurse Planner Action Points A noninvasive device that electrically stimulates the trigeminal nerve prevented migraines for patients whose episodes were not well controlled by medication alone. Note that the Cefaly device consists of an eye glasses-style band with a self-adhesive electrode above the bridge of the nose covering the supratrochlear and supraorbital branches of the trigeminal nerve.   A noninvasive device that electrically stimulates the trigeminal nerve prevented migraines for patients whose episodes were not well controlled by medication alone, a trial showed. The number of days with a migraine dropped significantly by about two per month in the supraorbital transcutaneous stimulation group, without a change in the sham control group, Jean Schoenen, MD, PhD, of Belgium’s Liège University, and colleagues found. While the difference between the two didn’t reach statistical significance, the coprimary endpoint showed three times more responders with at least a 50% drop in migraine days with neurostimulation (38% versus 12%, P=0.023), the group reported in the Feb. 19 issue of Neurology. “The therapeutic gain (26%) is within the range of those reported for other preventive drug and nondrug anti-migraine treatments,” they wrote. An accompanying editorial called for further study due to some issues with the trial, particularly whether blinding was good enough. The 16 mA electrical pulses delivered by the device at 60 Hz intervals would be easy to feel if patients touched the electrodes whereas the 1 mA-, 1 Hz-sham stimuli “would be barely noticeable,” noted Eishi Asano, MD, PhD, of Wayne State University in Detroit, and Peter J. Goadsby, MD, PhD, of the University of California San Francisco. “Taken together, this study has provided Class III evidence that neurostimulation with this device is effective and safe as a preventive therapy for migraine,” they concluded. The PREMICE trial (Prevention of Migraine using the STS Cefaly) randomized 67 adults with at least two migraine attacks per month, regardless of aura, at five Belgian tertiary headache clinics to wear the sham or real device for 20 minutes daily for 3 months. The Cefaly device consists of an eye glasses-style band with a...

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